Our 41th Year - Updated May 3, 2014

    In addition to selling our own books, we are the
    North American distributor for Carmania Press, London.

    NEW FOR 2013!
    FREE BOOKS - FREE SHIPPING

  • Book Categories: Our Online Catalog
  • PURPLE MOUNTAIN PRESS Books:
    New York State, Colonial History, Maritime
  • CARMANIA PRESS Maritime Books
  • PURPLE MOUNTAIN PRESS Mysteries
  • How to Reach Us
  • How to order our books
  • About Purple Mountain Press
  • Out-of-Print Book Bargains
  • Special Collectors' Editions
  • How to Submit Manuscripts or Proposals
  • You may search this site by author, title or subject.

    Search our Site:

    sitemap
    For NEW BOOKS and FEATURED TITLES: Scroll down
    QUICK SEARCH: Subjects: Native Americans and Ethnic Groups | Colonial History | Transportation - Maritime | Folklore - Folklife | Outdoor Recreation | Art and Architecture | Literature | Regions: The Catskills | The Hudson Valley | The Mohawk Valley - Central New York | The Adirondacks | The Champlain Valley Special interests: Horticulture




    FEATURED TITLES



    THE CRY THAT RANG FROM BRUSSELS TO NEW AMSTERDAM
    The Walloons and Flemings
    Make Their Way to America

    by Alfred H. Marks and Francis Devos

    NEW:In the 16th century, the converts to the new Calvinist religion in the southern Netherlands fought on the losing side in the revolution against Spain and the Catholic Church. Unsuccessful in their battle to win the right to worship as they wished in their homeland, where they were treated as criminals, they wandered stateless for decades and finally crossed the Atlantic in the company of Dutch entrepreneurs to populate important areas of the New World. These refugees from the southern provinces, whose new neighbors were Dutch, gradually forgot that they were not ethnically Dutch but Walloon and Flemish, from a part of the world that is now known as Belgium. This book is an effort to retell their frequently distorted and even suppressed story.




    MOUNTAIN RAILROADS
    OF NEW YORK STATE
    Volume 4
    WHERE DID THE TRACKS GO IN THE CATSKILLS?

    by Michael Kudish

    NEW: This monumental railroad atlas covers the Catskill region from the Hudson Valley to the West Branch of the Delaware River Valley. A series of short lines that served individual industries and construction sites are also described along with a few railroads that were partially built but never completed. Included are brief cronologies of the two recent tourist lines: the Catskill Mountain Railroad and the Delaware & Ulster Rail Ride. Besides the rail lines, there are chapters on railroad-related passengers, forestry, agriculture, and mining along with railroad facilities. There is catalog of 379 such industries and facilities and 191 maps of track plans.

    A LIST OF RAIL LINES COVERED IN ALL FOUR VOLUMES
    Total pages: 1,228 • Total maps: 668




    A CATSKILL CATALOG
    by Bill Birns

    NEW:For more than three years, Bill Birns, of Fleischmanns, has explored the history, geography, arts and culture of the Catskills in a weekly essay published in the Catskill Mountain News. Now, A Catskill Catalog is a new book published by Purple Mountain Press. Bill will be signing copies, rain or shine, at the street festival in Fleischmanns on Saturday, May 28th, 10:00 to 2:00. In 84 essays, he takes his readers on 800-word journeys of discovery, compact vignettes, windows into mountain history, mountain people, and mountain life.








    THE 1776-1777 NORTHERN CAMPAIGNS OF THE AMERICAN WAR FOR INDEPENDENCE AND THEIR SEQUEL:
    Contemporary Maps
    of Mostly German Origin

    by Thomas M. Barker and Paul H. Huey

    NEW: This is the first, full-scale, presentation in atlas form of the two, abortive British-German invasions of New York - events crucial to understanding the rebel American victory in the War for Independence. The bulk of the maps are from the German archives. The material has previously been little used by researchers in the United States due to linguistic and handwriting barriers. The volume includes transcriptions, translations, and detailed textual analysis of the naval and land operations of 1776 and 1777. It is written from a novel military-historical perspective, namely, British, German, loyalist, French Canadian, and First American. The attack of Benedict Arnold and Richard Montgomery on Québec City, the colonial assailants' repulse and withdrawal to the Province of New York and the Hudson River corridor, prior actions in the adjacent St. Lawrence-Richelieu river region of Canada, the Battle of Valcour Island on Lake Champlain, the forts at Crown Point and Ticonderoga, and the Battles of Bennington and Saratoga all receive detailed attention. The last section of the atlas deals with the less known, final phase of combat, in which the Britons, Germans, refugee tories, Québec militia, and Amerindians kept the insurgents off balance by mounting numerous small-scale expeditions into New York.



    IN THE CATSKILLS
    Selections from the Writings of John Burroughs

    Edited and with photographs by Clifton Johnson

    NEW: One hundred years ago, shortly after he acquired an old farmhouse he called "Woodchuck Lodge," near his boyhood home in Roxbury, New York, John Burroughs' friend Clifton Johnson published In the Catskills, a selection of Burroughs' nature essays. He told Johnson at the time, "The charm of Slabsides [his rustic retreat in the Hudson Valley] had faded, and then I realized that the place in all the world that appealed most to me was the old boyhood farm, and that I was an alien elsewhere. I'd been homesick over forty years. . . . The landscape had come to be a sort of outlying part of me, and it was a lucky day when it was here I would spend the rest of my summers." Nowhere is a love of Catskill Mountain landscape, its wildlife and people more exquisitely expressed then in these eight essays collected by Johnson and illustrated with his photographs.





    EMPIRES IN THE MOUNTAINS
    French and Indian War Campaigns and Forts in the Lake Champlain, Lake George, and Hudson River Corridor

    by Russell P. Bellico

    NEW: Empires in the Mountains is the first volume to focus entirely on the campaigns and forts along the Lake Champlain, Lake George, and Hudson River corridor during the French and Indian War (1754-1763). It covers the epic battles of the war in the lake valleys, as well as the arduous task of building fortresses and warships in the wilderness of northern New York. Relying on original documents, the book provides a firsthand human dimension in recounting the extraordinary events of the war. Nicholas Westbrook, director emeritus at Fort Ticonderoga, has suggested that "Not since Francis Parkman. . .has the epic story of the "Warpath of Empire" been told with such sweep and such rich detail." Gary Zaboly, author of A True Ranger, called Empires "a commanding history. . .highly readable and authoritative, easily the best single book" on the subject.



    LOST ARROWHEADS AND BROKEN POTTERY
    A History of Native Americans in Bear Mountain State Park, New York

    by Edward J. Lenik


    NEW: Co-published with the Palisades Interstate Park Commission.

    Edward J. Lenik is a professional archaeologist whose sights have been focused for many years on the cultural history of the Ramapo Mountains and the western Hudson Highlands, specifically in Harriman, Bear Mountain, and Sterling Forest state parks. He is conducting an intensive survey of prehistoric Native American sites in the parks.







    Our French and Indian War
    Commemoration


    1754-1763 * * * 250 Years * * * 2004-2013

    Our Quadricentennial
    Commemoration


    1609 * * * 400 Years * * * 2009
    Hudson • Fulton • Champlain




    RECENTLY PUBLISHED


    Essential Champlain Valley works
    by Russell Bellico


    Chronicles of
    Lake George

    and
    Chronicles of
    Lake Champlain



    Also: History of Lake Champlain
    by Peter Palmer and
    The French Occupation of the
    Champlain Valley, 1609-1759

    by Guy Omeron Coolidge




    Ward Eastman is back in two new mystery novellas set in the Catskills: MURDER AT THE STREAMSIDE and MURDER AT THE RESERVOIR. Norman Van Valkenburg's surveyor-sleuth finds murder and mayhem at the sites of the Ashokan and Pepacton Reservoirs. See why Hudson Valley Magazine calls Norman J. Van Valkenburgh a "Master of Mystery."



    THE RIVER INDIANS
    Mohicans Making History

    by Shirley W. Dunn


    NEW: Shirley Dunn’s new book presents a stirring look at historic events in which the Mohicans (called River Indians) participated: Leaders among the native nations on the Hudson, Mohicans welcomed Henry Hudson, who visited them for 13 days. They initiated the upriver fur trade and continued it for a century. Mohicans were close friends with the Dutch leader, Arent Van Curler, and helped save the farms of Rensselaerswyck. They fought beside English soldiers in wars against Canada from 1690 to 1765, protected Albany from attack from Canada, and enlisted in the Revolution on the American side.

    Dunn emphasizes the importance of the Mohicans to the history of New York colony and state. Today, many of us live on land from Dutchess County to Lake Champlain that once was theirs.




    JANE COLDEN
    America's First Woman Botanist

    by Paul Ivaska Robbins


    NEW: In eighteenth-century America, “A female botanist was a rare thing to contemplate,” according to Raymond Phineas Stearns in his 1970 compendium, Science in the British Colonies of America. The daughter of the colonial lieutenant governor of the colony of New York and a naturalist well known to the international circle of botanists, Jane Colden became her father’s protégé. She corresponded regularly with several of her father’s friends, exchanging information about plants. Jane produced an herbal describing in both words and drawings 341 plants that grew in and around her father’s 3,000-acre estate west of Newburgh, New York. The manuscript now resides in the Natural History Museum in London.







    MOUNTAIN RAILROADS OF NEW YORK STATE, VOLUME 3
    Where Did the Tracks Go in the Eastern Adirondacks?

    by Michael Kudish


    NEW: This volume covers the eastern portion of the Adirondacks, especially the Delaware & Hudson from Whitehall to the Canadian border. All its branches and connecting lines are described. The book includes a chapter on Amtrak and on non-connecting rail lines. The maps in the Mountain Railroads of New York State: Where Did the Tracks Go? series combine detail from multiple sources and will greatly assist the reader in the field to locate precisely sites of historic railroad activity. Volume I, published in 2005, and Volume II, published in 2007, respectively covered the western and central Adirondacks. Volume IV (May 2011) will cover the Catskills.


    Where Did the Tracks Go in the Central Adirondacks?

    Where Did the Tracks Go in the Western Adirondacks?



    INTERNET SPECIAL:
    Buy three copies of Mountain Railroads of New York State: Where Did the Tracks Go?
    (mix or match)and receive a free copy of the hardcover history of New York State's first two railroads ($25.00 value):
    Pioneer American Railroads: The Mohawk and Hudson & The Saratoga and Schenectady.



    HELL ON THE EAST RIVER
    British Prison Ships in the American Revolution

    by Larry Lowenthal


    NEW: Glorious names like Concord, Saratoga, Valley Forge and Yorktown still ring in American history and are universally recognized. Far fewer people have heard of Wallabout Bay on the Brooklyn shore of the East River or know the terrible story of American sailors who were imprisoned there on wretched hulks like the Jersey. Probably more Americans died there than in all the battles of the War for Independence. The author, Larry Lowenthal, uses prisoners' own accounts to describe the agony of imprisonment. He analyzes the number of deaths, examines the reasons for the tragedy, and describes the 100-year struggle to erect the present Prison Ship Martyrs' monument in Fort Greene Park, Brooklyn.





    RONDOUT: A HUDSON RIVER PORT

    by Bob Steuding


    NEW: Bob Steuding (The Last of the Handmade Dams: The Story of the Ashokan Reservoir and The Heart of the Catskills) presents a history of the once thriving port of Rondout, now part of Kingston. It is a tale of floods, fires and plagues; of commercial enterprise and the acquisition of vast, untaxed fortunes as well as the expression of public spiritedness in both peace and war. From the early days of Dutch settlement to the boom years in the 19th century after the construction of the Delaware & Hudson canal to the final flowering of Rondout at Kingston Point, this book portrays the vibrant, often rambunctious, life of one of the great river ports and the characters who built it.





    LISTEN TO THE WHISTLE
    An Anecdotal History of the Wallkill Valley Railroad
    in Ulster and Orange Counties, New York

    by Carleton Mabee


    In this first book ever to be published on the Wallkill Valley Railroad, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Carleton Mabee tells the story of a gallant little railroad that connected Orange and Ulster Counties and aspired to be part of a major trunk line reaching from metropolitan New York all the way to Albany. A human, more than technological, story, it tells not only of hissing steam engines but also of trainmen high in their cabs, farmers shipping milk and fruit, children riding to school, and the weary hearing train whistles as hints of adventure in distant places. Long out of print in hardcover, Listen to the Whistle, has just been released in paper.


    166 pages, 8.5 x 11, illustrated, paperback, $22.50.




    FROM THE COALFIELDS
    TO THE HUDSON

    A History of the Delaware & Hudson Canal

    by Larry Lowenthal


    In photographs and paintings the Delaware & Hudson Canal appears calm and unrufffled. The charming picture is not entirely false, but there is another dimension to the D&H Company, a corporation struggling to succeed in a hostile and risky business. Except in its final years the history of the canal was marked by a series of crises or conflicts, each of which threatened the survival of the company. Constant insecurity wore out the D&H managers, but as the company met its challenges in the formative years of American capitalism, it created a model for later enterprises. Now, more than a century after the last boatload of anthracite floated down the D&H Canal, this book gives a new and fuller perspective on this remarkable venture.

    First published in 1997, and long out of print, this second printing contains a 16-page supplement.





    PROMISED LAND
    Father Divine's Interracial Communities in Ulster County, New York

    by Carleton Mabee


    NEW: At the time he established his communities in Ulster County, Father Divine, an African American, was based in Harlem, He was one of the best known Americans of his time. He was also highly controversial. Time Magazine called him "slick" and "inexplicable. When his followers were beginning to move into Ulster County, the New Paltz News reported that the county's people "resent the very thought" of their arrival.

    Father Divine lifted the despairing from the gutter to self respect, but his methods troubled many observers. He commanded much wealth, but he mystified many critics as to where it came from. In the 1930s and 1940s, his movement was one of the most completely interracial movements in the US, but large numbers of Americans found this to be offensive.

    During the Great Depression, when Divine's movement was feeding thousands of the hungry, he established his first community in Ulster County, in New Paltz, in 1935. His communities survived in the county until 1985 when the last one, in Kingston, was sold off.

    Divine's communities were idealistic, nondenominational, unconventional. They were communities which Divine followers called collectively the Promised Land. After his death in 1965, the political scientist Leo Rosten called him "adorable," and claimed he taught a "sweet and beneficent faith," but added that he was also a fraud, a "mountebank." This is the story of Divine's communities in the "Promised Land," Ulster County.






    CATSKILL MOUNTAIN BLUESTONE

    by Alf Evers, Robert Titus, and Tim Weidner


    NEW: "By 1870, cutting the slabs out of mountain ledges became such big business that William M. Tweed, the political boss, finagled a partnership out of the New York and Pennsylvania Bluestone Company. He profited greatly by then arranging for the company to supply bluestone for city sidewalks. By the end of the 19th century, an estimated 10,000 men worked bluestone in New York. The Catskills were riddled with quarries. As concrete sidewalks replaced bluestone, the industry declined [until recently]. . . . Scores of new mines have been opened in the last six years, and many old ones have been reactivated. Bluestone, which had shrunk to little more than memories-is now a $100 million-a-year industry, located mostly in economically depressed Delaware and Broome Counties in the Catskills." --The New York Times, May 13, 2008

    "The growing bluestone industry is important to construction and architecture nationwide." --New York State Conservationist, August 2008




    We are pleased to announce the launch of our new educational division: "Books for Young New Yorkers"



    Important full-color regional titles for readers 9 to 12:
    AMERICA'S FIRST WILDERNESS: NEW YORK STATE'S FOREST PRESERVES
    by Norm Van Valkenburgh (44 pages, 6.50)
    THE MOHICANS by Aileen Weintraub and Shirley Dunn with paintings by L. F. Tantillo (39 pages, 6.50)
    SYBIL LUDINGTON: DISCOVERING THE LIFE OF A REVOLUTIONARY WAR HERO by V. T. Dacquino (37 pages, 6.50)
    SEEKING THE NORTHWEST PASSAGE: THE EXPLORATIONS AND DISCOVERIES OF CHAMPLAIN AND HUDSON
    by Don and Carol Thompson (88 pages, 8.50)



    THE HEART OF THE CATSKILLS

    by Bob Steuding


    The Heart of the Catskills by Bob Steuding, author of the popular and highly acclaimed The Last of the Handmade Dams: The Story of the Ashokan Reservoir. Steuding describes the early settlement of the area, its exploitation by the tanning industry, and the building of the Grand Hotel near Belleayre. He presents the stories of colorful personalities, such as Jim Dutcher, the mountain man; John Burroughs, the writer and naturalist; and others, who once peopled this wild and beautiful place.






    The WALKWAY OVER THE HUDSON is now open.
    Read the story of the bridge and the men who built it and used it.



    BRIDGING THE HUDSON by Carleton Mabee, third printing



    HARBOR HILL IMPORTS


    We are pleased to offer our North American customers the fine maritime books published by CARMANIA PRESS of London. All are definitive works by authorities in ocean liner and shipping history and feature superb reproductions of historic and
    modern photographs on heavily coated stock in sewn bindings.


    R.M.S. QUEEN ELIZABETH - THE ULTIMATE SHIP


    This is an extremely authoritative, lavishly illustrated history by Clive Harvey of Cunard's original Queen Elizabeth, running mate of the great Queen Mary and, for years after her completion in 1940, the largest liner in the World.

    THE FRED. OLSEN LINE AND ITS PASSENGER SHIPS
    A Pictorial Record of Passenger Ships in the 1930s



    SOUTHAMPTON SHIPPING with Portsmouth, Poole and Weymouth

    Copyright © 1998-2011 Purple Mountain Press. All rights reserved.